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AndrewSihler Free

Comics I Follow

Ink Pen

Ink Pen

By Phil Dunlap
Off the Mark

Off the Mark

By Mark Parisi
Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Thatababy

Thatababy

By Paul Trap
The Big Picture

The Big Picture

By Lennie Peterson
Crabgrass

Crabgrass

By Tauhid Bondia
Candorville

Candorville

By Darrin Bell
FoxTrot Classics

FoxTrot Classics

By Bill Amend
Lio

Lio

By Mark Tatulli
Michael Ramirez

Michael Ramirez

Scott Stantis

Scott Stantis

Luann

Luann

By Greg Evans
Dilbert Classics

Dilbert Classics

By Scott Adams
Looks Good on Paper

Looks Good on Paper

By Dan Collins
Foolish Mortals

Foolish Mortals

By Tom Horacek
Speed Bump

Speed Bump

By Dave Coverly
The Knight Life

The Knight Life

By Keith Knight
Henry Payne

Henry Payne

Red and Rover

Red and Rover

By Brian Basset
Cul de Sac

Cul de Sac

By Richard Thompson
Ordinary Bill

Ordinary Bill

By William Wilson
Loose Parts

Loose Parts

By Dave Blazek
Strange Brew

Strange Brew

By John Deering
Wondermark

Wondermark

By David Malki
John Deering

John Deering

Matt Davies

Matt Davies

Matt Bors

Matt Bors

Cow and Boy Classics

Cow and Boy Classics

By Mark Leiknes
Pearls Before Swine

Pearls Before Swine

By Stephan Pastis
Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Dark Side of the Horse

Dark Side of the Horse

By Samson
The Other Coast

The Other Coast

By Adrian Raeside
Stuart Carlson

Stuart Carlson

Bloom County

Bloom County

By Berkeley Breathed
Randolph Itch, 2 a.m.

Randolph Itch, 2 a.m.

By Tom Toles
In the Bleachers

In the Bleachers

By Ben Zaehringer
Dinosaur Comics

Dinosaur Comics

By Ryan North
Bob the Squirrel

Bob the Squirrel

By Frank Page
WuMo

WuMo

By Wulff & Morgenthaler
Steve Benson

Steve Benson

Kid Beowulf

Kid Beowulf

By Alexis E. Fajardo
Jeff Stahler

Jeff Stahler

ViewsMidEast

ViewsMidEast

By CartoonArts International
Breaking Cat News

Breaking Cat News

By Georgia Dunn
Joe Heller

Joe Heller

Working Daze

Working Daze

By John Zakour and Scott Roberts
Tarzan

Tarzan

By Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Awkward Yeti

The Awkward Yeti

By Nick Seluk
Zack Hill

Zack Hill

By John Deering and John Newcombe
Tom Toles

Tom Toles

Bird and Moon

Bird and Moon

By Rosemary Mosco
Real Life Adventures

Real Life Adventures

By Gary Wise and Lance Aldrich
False Knees

False Knees

By Joshua Barkman
Clay Bennett

Clay Bennett

Little Dog Lost

Little Dog Lost

By Steve Boreman
Green Humour

Green Humour

By Rohan Chakravarty
Jim Morin

Jim Morin

Bob Gorrell

Bob Gorrell

Mr. Lowe

Mr. Lowe

By Mark Pett

Recent Comments

  1. about 16 hours ago on Luann

    Stef is really a totally exasperating ditz, but if she’s a good lay (as I’m gathering Kip is, too), then that’s enough for both of them for a while.

  2. about 16 hours ago on Cul de Sac

    The “Shape of the Day”? Like cone, prism, and parallelepiped?

  3. 1 day ago on Jack Ohman

    Does Mr Newsom really talk like that?

  4. 1 day ago on Jack Ohman

    Yes and no. In a Republic, the population (however subdivided) by their vote chooses their representatives.

    In our system of government, representatives choose their voters.

    I don’t think that fits the definition of “Republic”.

    Also, I suppose that in a classic Republic, “the people” are free male citizens of a certain minimum age, a small minority in societies with a lot of slaves.

  5. 1 day ago on Frazz

    Well, for most counting systems, utility is the ruling consideration. For example, the binary system works really well for computers, you could use other bases (indeed, 16 has its uses) but none would be as useful. On the other hand, it’s awful for any other purpose. The preponderance of 12 in commerce has to do with the ease with which it can be evenly divided in several ways, in sharp contrast to 10. So also the British business of 12 pence to a shilling, and the prominence of sixpence in the coinage and three pennies (thruppence) in common parlance. It sort of breaks down from there, true (twenty shillings in a pound, twenty one in in guinea).

    Babylonian didn’t really have a system of enumeration based on 60; it is true that there is a cuneiform symbol that stands for 60 (which otherwise could be written with six “Wilkelhacken”) much like the fact that there is a cuneiform symbol for ⅔, but otherwise both the notation and the language is strictly decimal. The prominence of 60 in astronomy and geometry basically carries the “dividability” principle to an extreme. Twelve months is sort of an accident, the real basis is the seven-day week, one fourth of a lunation of 28 days (or nearly). There were other systems, a week of ten days, or nine (the Latin word Nūndinae “market day” is based on a nine-day week) and the Romans didn’t have weeks at all, otherwise. The Monday Tuesday (etc.) business is based on Babylonian cosmology, having to do with gods associated with the known celestial bodies.

  6. 1 day ago on Crabgrass

    Cute!

  7. 3 days ago on Luann

    Neener-neener! You misspelled “comment”. The jock’s on you!

  8. 4 days ago on Clay Jones

    Nice allusion to Finding Nemo, there.

  9. 5 days ago on Wondermark

    II think you’re onto something. And he certainly had “super powers”, dividing the waters of, well, Yam Sūf, which was more like a marsh than the “red sea”.

    Exodus says that Moses depended on Aaron to be a sort of mouthpiece (as we would say) because he himself was “halting of speech”. This has traditionally been interpreted as a stammer, but surely God wouldn’t appoint a stammerer to lead his chosen people out of Egypt! What if the problem was that he didn’t actually know Hebrew very well?

  10. 5 days ago on Tom the Dancing Bug

    I think it was Herbert Spencer who noted that humans, as a species, are both gregarious (we would probably say “social”) and predatory. A volatile combination! The rest is history. . . .